T02P25 - Social Cohesion, Diversity and Public Policies

Topic : Comparative Public Policy

Panel Chair : Sebastian ROCHE - sebastian.roche@sciencespo-grenoble.fr

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

Social integration processes were devised of by historic leading sociologist as the mechanisms through which a society holds together, populations are made into a collectivity. Today’s societies are facing the challenges of increased individuation, new socialization technologies, diversity in ethnicity and religious or irreligious beliefs often in relation with migrations, globalization with increased inequalities, and higher distrust in police and government. Obvious manifestations of disunion can be outgroup defiance, hate crimes, agglutination/ segregation processes, national de identification, resentment vis-à-vis public institutions and organizations (school, police).

Comparative surveys allow to observe how national policies impact various sections of the young population, for example to compare the effects of policies regarding school or neighborhood segregation, or policing policies in terms of stop and search and how those impact the sharing of common values, attachment to a country and inter group relations.

Based on the UPYC project (Understanding and Preventing Youth Crime, a consortium of researchers, part of the 3rd sweep of the International Self Reported Delinquency Survey that covers all regions of the world), or other empirical sources, the panel will tackle the issue of cohesion in a comparative cross national fashion. The effect of school and policing policies as well as social identity (religious, ethnic, national) on cohesion and crime will be scrutinized.

Call for papers

Social integration processes were devised of by historic leading sociologist as the mechanisms through which a society holds together, populations are made into a collectivity. Today’s societies are facing the challenges of increased individuation, new socialization technologies, diversity in ethnicity and religious or irreligious beliefs often in relation with migrations, globalization with increased inequalities, and higher distrust in police and government. Obvious manifestations of disunion can be outgroup defiance, hate crimes, agglutination/ segregation processes, national de identification, resentment vis-à-vis public institutions and organizations (school, police).

Comparative surveys allow to observe how national policies impact various sections of the young population, for example to compare the effects of policies regarding school or neighborhood segregation, or policing policies in terms of stop and search and how those impact the sharing of common values, attachment to a country and inter group relations.

Based on the UPYC project (Understanding and Preventing Youth Crime, a consortium of researchers, part of the 3rd sweep of the International Self Reported Delinquency Survey that covers all regions of the world), or other empirical sources, the panel will tackle the issue of cohesion in a comparative cross national fashion. The effect of school and policing policies as well as social identity (religious, ethnic, national) on cohesion and crime will be scrutinized.

This panel is targeted at empirical cross national surveys of social cohesion that relate to street level experience of public policies, in particular regarding young people (adolescents, young adults). Participants to International Self Reported Delinquency Survey or comparable surveys that cover various part of the world are particularly invited to apply.

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