T08P08 - Climate Change and Democratic Policymaking: A Critical Policy Studies Roundtable

Topic : Policy Discourse and Critical Policy Research

Panel Chair : Frank Fischer - ffischer@gmx.com

Panel Second Chair : Ching Leong - chingl@gmail.com

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

Call for papers

Session 1

Thursday, June 29th 10:30 to 12:30 (Li Ka Shing LKS 1 - 1)

Discussants

Ching Leong - chingl@gmail.com - Institute of Water Policy, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, Singapore - Singapore

Democracy, Expertise, and Climate Change

Makoto Usami - usami.makoto.2r@kyoto-u.ac.jp - Kyoto University - Japan

Climate change presents an enormous challenge to democratic policymaking in economically advanced societies, which are large emitters of greenhouse gases (GHGs), in two ways. On one hand, its adverse impacts on humanity will be particularly serious in the South, while many citizens in the North pay scant moral attention to the well-being of populations in the South. On the other hand, because of the time gap between GHG emissions and negative impact occurrences, these impacts will predictably become intensified to distant future generations, whereas most citizens do not concern about the remote future. Taking the spatial and temporal myopia of the general public as a point of departure, this paper explores two issues surrounding the process of democratic policymaking in a developed country.

 

The first concerns models of the democratic policy process. In the orthodox model, great varieties of interests and values among citizens are collected and added through the processes of election and legislation and are eventually transformed into a set of public policies. Call this the aggregate model. I seek to illustrate how the aggregate model occasionally fails in the context of climate change policy, with reference to recent cases. Then, I propose the dialogical model, in which the government and citizens carry on a critical dialogue through the processes of policymaking, election and other forms of political participation, and even constitutional litigation.

 

The second issue is what role experts can play in policy processes. In many industrialized societies, natural and social scientists get involved in the enactment process of mitigation and adaptation policies, providing legislators and administrators with specialized knowledge on the impact and influence of climate change and on the cost and effectiveness of climate policy. However, it has been an unexplored question how experts, including psychologists and educators, can help policymakers to develop policy tools which broaden citizens’ vision. I examine this question in the contexts of school education and ordinary public services.

Scott Valentine

Scott Valentine - scott.valentine@nus.edu.sg - LKY School of PUblic Policy - Singapore

Climate Change and Democratic Policymaking: A Critical Policy Studies Roundtable

Maarten Hajer

Maarten HAJER - m.a.hajer@uu.nl - Utrecht University - Netherlands

Climate Change and Democratic Policymaking: A Critical Policy Studies Roundtable

Jennifer Curtin

Jennifer Curtin - j.curtin@auckland.ac.nz - University of Auckland - New Zealand

Climate Change and Democratic Policymaking: A Critical Policy Studies Roundtable

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