T03P07 - Urban Policies & Health Inequalities

Topic : Policy and Politics sponsored by Policy & Politics Journal

Panel Chair : Daniel Weinstock - directoradmin.ihsp@mcgill.ca

Panel Second Chair : Shona Hilton - shona.hilton@glasgow.ac.uk

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

In this panel a selection of papers may be considered for the Policy & Politics journal.

 

 

Over fifty-percent of the world’s population now resides in an urban setting, and these urban centers provide unique challenges for health policy makers (see Galea & Vlahov 2005; Gordon-Larsen & Nelson 2006; Rundle et al. 2006; Maas et al 2009; etc.) Not only do cities produce novel health risks, they also tend to make measurement of health inequalities more difficult as large portions of the population reside in slums and informal settlements (WHO 2010). Much research examines the differences between urban and rural health outcomes, however, urban health inequities are "different in magnitude and distribution", and they often require cross-sectoral cooperation and empowered local leadership to achieve results (WHO 2010).

The purpose of this panel is to investigate urban public policy’s ability – both realized and potential – in addressing health inequalities.

Call for papers

Over fifty-percent of the world’s population now resides in an urban setting, and these urban centers provide unique challenges for health policy makers (see Galea & Vlahov 2005; Gordon-Larsen & Nelson 2006; Rundle et al. 2006; Maas et al 2009; etc.) Not only do cities produce novel health risks, they also tend to make measurement of health inequalities more difficult as large portions of the population reside in slums and informal settlements (WHO 2010). Much research examines the differences between urban and rural health outcomes, however, urban health inequities are “different in magnitude and distribution”, and they often require cross-sectoral cooperation and empowered local leadership to achieve results (WHO 2010).

The purpose of this panel is to investigate urban public policy’s ability – both realized and potential – in addressing health inequalities. We invite papers that evaluate existing policies, papers that provide case studies of multisectoral collaboration in addressing urban health inequity, as well as papers that put forward unique methodological approaches for capturing and describing urban health inequalities. 

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