T15P04 - New Political Regimes, Old Public Policy and Governing Patterns?

Topic : Democracy, Political Regime and Policy Process

Panel Chair : Mauricio Dussauge - mauricio.dussauge@cide.edu

Panel Second Chair : Joseluis Mendez - jlmendez@colmex.mx

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

During the past three decades, Latin American countries have gone through significant processes of democratisation, economic liberalisation, and internationalisation. These processes have brought with them several political, economic, and administrative changes, and have opened up new policy and regulatory fields of intervention for national public sector institutions. However, while the transformations in terms of constitutional principles, legal norms, and even organizational structures are generally clear, we still know very little about:  a) whether and how these formal transformations have actually changed traditional policymaking processes, old governing arrangements, executive-legislative relationships, federal/decentralisation arrangements, state-society exchanges, corruption levels and perceptions, policy analytical and regulatory capacities, or media-government relationships; b) whether we can find similar policy and governing patterns across the Latin American region, including forms of political/bureaucratic resistance or new regulatory developments, leading to some kind of regional policy convergence; or c) the extent to which recent theoretical debates in the international public policy and administration literature help describe and/or explain whether, how, and why democratisation, economic liberalisation, and internationalisation have contributed to new policy and governing patterns in each Latin American country. This panel represents an excellent opportunity to contribute to our empirical knowledge about the policy and governing transformations that have occurred in the region; to assess the usefulness of international theories, approaches, and debates to describe, understand, and/or explain ongoing political changes in the region and its various countries; and to build new policy theories and concepts grounded on the Latin American experience.   

Call for papers

In the past decades, Latin American countries have gone through significant changes in political, economic, and administrative terms, all of which have been triggered by democratization, economic liberalization, and internationalization trends. This panel seeks to make a contribution to our empirical and theoretical knowledge about the policy and governing transformations that have occurred in this region. We therefore seek papers that aim to: assess the usefulness of international theories, approaches, and debates to describe, understand, and/or explain ongoing political changes in the region and its various countries; and/or try to build new policy theories and concepts grounded on the Latin American experience. More specifically, the panel will seek to explore questions such as, has democratization led to better quality of government levels in Latin American countries? Has economic liberalization brought about the emergence of regulatory capitalism structures in the region? Can we speak of institutional, administrative or policy convergence across Latin American countries, and/or across policy sectors? Where do Latin American policy makers get their policy reform ideas, how, and why? In broader terms, the panel will try to explore the extent to which theories and approaches such as “institutionalism”, “multiple streams”, “advocacy coalitions”, “policy dismantling”, “reputation management”, “policy transfer”, and many others are applicable to recent Latin American countries’ public policy experiences. More specifically, papers could address one or more of the following topics: 

a) Effects of democratisation, economic liberalisation, and internationalisation on Latin American political institutions and policy processes
b) Policy change and continuity in specific fields
c) Structural policy reforms and their impact on administrative structures
d) The true value of new policy values: transparency, accountability, open government, participation
e) Policy diffusion, policy transfer and policy convergence across the region
f) Policy influence of political, economic, and non-governmental actors
g) Policy capacity in government and non-governmental institutions
h) Policy impacts of corruption and clientelism

Papers adopting comparative approaches, mixed-methods, and/or assessing the usefulness of contemporary policy theories are particularly encouraged.

 

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