T03P01 - Innovative Governance and the Governance of Change

Topic : Policy and Politics sponsored by Policy & Politics Journal

Panel Chair : Lain Dare - lain.dare@canberra.edu.au

Panel Second Chair : Diane Stone - diane.stone@warwick.ac.uk

Panel Third Chair : Paul Fawcett - paul.fawcett@canberra.edu.au

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

In this panel a selection of papers may be considered for the Policy & Politics journal.

 

How do governments cope in an era of rapid social and economic change, technological innovation and transboundary policy problems? This panel seeks to contribute to the field of policy studies concerned with the ongoing changes in governance, both fast and slow, that governments have introduced in response to this changing context and the transformations in statehood that they are driving. Changing realities of participation in governance may include new arrangements of science-policy interaction as well as initiatives for the practical and/or deliberative involvement of both new and old constituencies.

Increasingly our understanding and implementation of governance is challenged by trends such as digitalisation, democratic participation and resistance, scientific and technological innovation, and cross-jurisdictional policy problems. In sociology, theorists such as Bauman (2006) and Beck have examined these changes in social order and their impacts on social change. For example, Bauman has argued that the liquidity or fluidity of modern life leads individuals to live their lives under conditions of endemic uncertainty and flux. When applied to governance, this changing social order can create unpredictable and uncertain political dynamics which require a critical rethinking and consequent shift in how political authority is exercised, and how innovative governance instruments can enable a recoupling between those who exercise political authority with those who are governed by it. This is a problem that all governments face both democratic and non-democratic.

As such, innovative instruments of governance are potential drivers for the governance of change. Change can be fast, slow, incremental or non-existent but potentially disruptive and paradigm shifting change will often require innovative governance processes. Similarly, slow incremental reform processes and stable governance environments can benefit from innovative governance instruments that create an environment in which change can take place by disrupting longstanding path dependencies. Any given policy sector or public management field might encompass multiple rates of change at different levels (e.g. BREXIT), requiring multiple governance approaches that are each carefully designed to target specific outcomes. This blending of governance instruments including market-based, participatory, information tools, or ‘nudge’ approaches, requires the co-production of science and politics that draws on a range of theoretical and empirical concepts from across multiple disciplines, including policy studies, sociology, and innovation studies.

This panel explores this nexus of theory and practice and seeks submissions that address both conceptual and theoretical insights on styles and approaches of ‘innovative’ or ‘experimentalist governance’ and lessons about the social praxis and technical hardware required to cope with dynamism and change. In bringing together a critical understanding of theory and practice, the panel will contribute to the development of informed innovative governance design that furthers our capacity to tackle the complex challenges facing contemporary democracies.

Areas of inquiry may include, but are not limited to, the following:

·       Public sector innovation and reform of political institutions

·       Multi-level governance and network governance

·       Public authority, policy entrepreneurship and expertise

·       Learning and leadership as drivers and/or moderators of change

·       Rapid technological change, scientific discovery and risk

 

A selection of papers may be considered for the journal Policy and Politics.

Call for papers

How do governments cope in an era of rapid social and economic change, technological innovation and transboundary policy problems? This panel seeks to understand and inform the changing realities of change governance in response to these driving forces, exploring new and innovative governance arrangements for science-policy interaction and the practical and/or deliberative involvement of both new and old constituencies.

Our understanding and implementation of governance is increasingly challenged by trends such as digitalisation, democratic participation and resistance, technological innovation, and cross-jurisdictional policy problems. Bauman has argued that the fluidity of modern life results in conditions of endemic uncertainty and change. Whether it is fast, slow or incremental, change can be potentially disruptive with paradigm shifting change often requiring innovative governance approaches. Any given governance problem might encompass change at multiple rates, across multiple levels with multiple governance approaches (e.g. neoliberal, participatory, ‘nudge’ approaches). This blending of governance instruments requires the co-production of science and politics that draws on a range of theoretical and empirical concepts from across multiple disciplines, including policy studies, sociology, and innovation studies.

This panel seeks submissions that address both conceptual and theoretical insights on ‘innovative’ or ‘experimentalist governance’ and lessons about the social praxis and technical hardware required to cope with change. In bringing together a critical understanding of theory and practice the panel will contribute to the development of informed innovative governance design, furthering our capacity to tackle the complex challenges facing contemporary democracies.

Areas of inquiry may include, but are not limited to, the following:

·       Public sector innovation and reform of political institutions

·       Multi-level governance and network governance

·       Public authority, policy entrepreneurship and expertise

·       Learning and leadership as drivers and/or moderators of change

·       Rapid technological change, scientific discovery and risk

 

A selection of papers may be considered for the journal Policy and Politics.

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