T02P33 - Comparative Public Policy: An Asian Perspective

Topic : Comparative Public Policy

Panel Chair : Wilson Wai Ho Wong - wwong@cuhk.edu.hk

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

The main theme of the panel is comparative public policy from an Asian perspective which tries to focus on public policy and administration issues affecting Asian countries in a collaborative and globalized world. With this them in mind, a main objective of this panel is to use Asia as a context for generating useful knowledge in comparative public policy which can be adopted for addressing policy problems by taking into consideration of differences across regions. Its concern matches the theme of the conference very well which recognizes and appreciates the importance and relevancy of the fact that public policy and administration is now functioning in a collaborative manner between government and non-governmental actors which must integrate between a regional context, which is Asia in this panel, and a globalized environment. In doing so, it would like to adopt a comparative perspective with an area focus of Asia to examine how actors, including cities, states and city-states, in Asia are managing their problems, reforms, and concerns in public policy and management in this increasingly challenging and complex environment.

 

With globalization, comparative public policy is a growing and revitalizing field in the study of public administration and public management. By being comparative, it is not arguing from an extreme angle that Asia is so unique that all Westernized and imported theories are totally irrelevant. It would like to draw attention to the importance of contextual factors of each country and region which inevitably lead to a gap, which is not necessarily unbridgeable, between existing generic theories and the theory and practice of that particular country and region. A comparative perspective is both necessary and desirable for building more comprehensive theories and promoting better practice, which actually have implications beyond Asia on all regions, including the West, the origin of many major theories of public administration and management being applied around the globe. In short, it would like to create public policy knowledge that can bridge regions by clearly identifying contextual variables and understanding their impact on our subject of concern rather than creating some unique knowledge about Asia which cannot travel outside the region.

 

The panel aims to provide a good opportunity for scholars and experienced practitioners with knowledge and interest on this area to present their findings for promoting cross-facilitation of knowledge. Consistent with the conference theme of being interdisciplinary, the panel encourages paper submissions from all disciplines, including economics, political science, public administration, and law, that are adopting an comparative approach with an area focus on Asia. Topics which explain and examine the theory and practice gaps between Asia and the West, identify the contextual factors leading to those gaps, and importantly, make suggestions for better theory building and integration and more useful practice are particularly welcome.

 

Call for papers

The main theme of the panel is comparative public policy from an Asian perspective which tries to focus on public policy and administration issues affecting Asian countries. With this them in mind, a main objective of this panel is to use Asia as a context for generating useful knowledge in comparative public policy which can be adopted for addressing policy problems by taking into consideration of differences across regions. It recognizes and appreciates the importance and relevancy of the fact that public policy is now functioning in a collaborative manner between government and non-governmental actors which must integrate between a regional context, which is Asia in this panel, and a globalized environment.

 

By being comparative, it is not arguing from an extreme angle that Asia is so unique that all Westernized and imported theories are totally irrelevant. It would like to draw attention to the importance of contextual factors of each country and region which inevitably lead to a gap, which is not necessarily unbridgeable, between existing generic theories and the theory and practice of that particular country and region. In short, it would like to create public policy knowledge that can bridge regions by clearly identifying contextual variables and understanding their impact on our subject of concern rather than creating some unique knowledge about Asia which cannot travel outside the region.

 

The panel aims to provide a good opportunity for scholars and experienced practitioners with knowledge and interest on this area and would like to present their works to attain the above objectives of the panel. The panel encourages paper submissions from all disciplines, including economics, political science, public administration, and law, that are adopting a comparative approach with an area focus on Asia. 

 

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