T07P01 - The Design of Policy and Governance Design: Principles, Practices and Potentials

Topic : Policy Design, Policy Analysis, Expertise and Evaluation

Panel Chair : Arwin van Buuren - vanbuuren@fsw.eur.nl

Panel Second Chair : Martijn van der Steen - steen@nsob.nl

Panel Third Chair : Giliberto Capano - Giliberto.capano@sns.it

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

Living labs, policy experiments, and other ways of ‘learning-by-doing’ gain rapidly popularity in the field of public policy. Such practices have in common that they all look for new and innovative solutions for recurring policy problems and want to systematically collect evidence about what policy solutions works. This development is reflected in the rise of “design thinking” in the policy sciences (Howlett, 2014; Bason, 2016; Mintrom & Luetjens, 2016). Design thinking can help to bring in more creativity in policy making, by applying prototyping and experimentation to enable creative learning processes (Crosby et al. 2016) and collaborative innovation. The rise of living labs, field labs, pilot programs in which all kinds of (participatory) design methods are applied, illustrates the increasing attention for this explorative style of policy-making, governance and public service delivery. However the public context in which design-thinking is applied, also raises serious dilemmas and questions (Hillgren et al. 2011).

 

The objectives of this panel are:

- to explore the principles of applying design-thinking in the worlds of policy-making and governance (what are the main elements of design approaches in this domain, what are the criteria that have to be met)

- to analyse and compare current practices of design approaches for policy-making and governance in order to find out relevant patterns, styles and typologies;

- to investigate the potentials as well as the pitfalls, limitations and normative dilemmas of design-thinking for policy and governance.

 

With this panel we will contribute to the emerging scientific debate about how to come to new ways of "analysis for policy" and "evidence-based policies" with help of new ideas about applying abductive reasoning, imagination and divergent thinking. Based upon the panel we will publish a special issue about this topic in a relevant journal in the field.  

 

References

Bason, C. (2016). Design for policy. Routledge.

Crosby, B. C., ‘t Hart, P., & Torfing, J. (2016). Public value creation through collaborative innovation. Public Management Review, 1-15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14719037.2016.1192165

Hillgren, P. A., Seravalli, A., & Emilson, A. (2011). Prototyping and infrastructuring in design for social innovation. CoDesign, 7(3-4), 169-183. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15710882.2011.630474

Howlett, M. (2014). From the ‘old’ to the ‘new’ policy design: design thinking beyond markets and collaborative governance. Policy Sciences, 47(3), 187-207. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11077-014-9199-0

Mintrom, M., & Luetjens, J. (2016). Design Thinking in Policymaking Processes: Opportunities and Challenges. Australian Journal of Public Administration, 75(3), 391-402.

 

 

Call for papers

Living labs, policy experiments, and other ways of ‘learning-by-doing’ gain rapidly popularity in the field of public policy. Such practices have in common that they all look for new and innovative solutions for recurring policy problems and want to systematically collect evidence about what policy solutions works. This development is reflected in the rise of “design thinking” in the policy sciences (Howlett, 2014; Bason, 2016; Mintrom & Luetjens, 2016). Design thinking can help to bring in more creativity in policy making, by applying prototyping and experimentation to enable creative learning processes (Crosby et al. 2016) and collaborative innovation. The rise of living labs, field labs, pilot programs in which all kinds of (participatory) design methods are applied, illustrates the increasing attention for this explorative style of policy-making, governance and public service delivery. However the public context in which design-thinking is applied, also raises serious dilemmas and questions (Hillgren et al. 2011). This panel is meant to explore the principles of applying design-thinking in the worlds of policy-making and governance, to analyse current practices and to reflect upon its potentials as well as its pitfalls.  

 

This panel invites papers that explore the principles, practices and potentials of applying design thinking or design approaches to solve governance issues. We welcome conceptual reflections about the meaning and possible approaches of design thinking for governance and public policy. But we are also highly interested in in-depth case studies and evaluations of applications of design-thinking (like design experiments). And we invite critical reflections about the applicability of applying approaches like prototyping in this field and the dilemmas surrounding those practices.

 

References

Bason, C. (2016). Design for policy. Routledge.

Crosby, B. C., ‘t Hart, P., & Torfing, J. (2016). Public value creation through collaborative innovation. Public Management Review, 1-15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14719037.2016.1192165

Hillgren, P. A., Seravalli, A., & Emilson, A. (2011). Prototyping and infrastructuring in design for social innovation. CoDesign, 7(3-4), 169-183. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15710882.2011.630474

Howlett, M. (2014). From the ‘old’ to the ‘new’ policy design: design thinking beyond markets and collaborative governance. Policy Sciences, 47(3), 187-207. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11077-014-9199-0

Mintrom, M., & Luetjens, J. (2016). Design Thinking in Policymaking Processes: Opportunities and Challenges. Australian Journal of Public Administration, 75(3), 391-402.

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