T13P04 - Gendered Innovations in Public Policy Research

Topic : Gender, Diversity and Public Policy

Panel Chair : Jennifer Curtin - j.curtin@auckland.ac.nz

Panel Second Chair : Jackie Steele - jfsteeleresearch@gmail.com

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

Gendered Innovations in Public Policy Research

Panel sponsored by IPSA RC19 Gender, Politics and Public Policy

 

The importance of gendered innovations in the sciences and the social sciences has become increasingly recognised in recent years (European Union, 2013; Jenkins and Keane, 2014; Sawer et al, 2016; Stanford, 2009).  ‘Gendered Innovation’ has been defined as the process that integrates sex and gender analysis into all phases of basic and applied research to assure excellence and quality in outcomes (Schiebinger et al 2013).  While this definition informs current research in the sciences, similar feminist approaches to public policy analysis have resulted in new theoretical, methodological and empirical understandings of how gender inequalities are produced through policy and what is required to achieve gender equality in the future.  As such, feminist and gendered policy research has enhanced the field of public policy, challenging the gender neutrality of core concepts and conclusions by ensuring gender, and intersectionality, sit at the centre of the analysis, (Agustin, 2013; Bacchi, 2009; Mazur, 2002; Sainsbury, 2009; Stetson and Mazur, 2010; Verloo et al, 2005).

 

Yet there remain many intractable policy ‘problems’, global and local, that continue to have a disproportional impact on women’s wellbeing and, at both the national and international level, systematic gender analysis remains patchy at best, often dependent on political will. Alongside this, evidence-based policy making, big data and ‘social investment’ strategies, have become the ‘go to’ concepts and methods for governments looking for ‘innovative’ solutions (Boyd and Crawford, 2013; Cairney, 2016; Lerman, 2013; Morel et al, 2012; Stoker and Evans, 2016).  Scholars are engaging critically with these constructs, but seldom from a gender or intersectional perspective.

 

We propose a panel on Gendered Innovations in Public Policy Research.  We welcome papers that take stock of the innovative knowledges and understandings produced by feminist policy scholars to date, evaluate feminist policy practices that have produced innovative or transformative change, and challenge and critique contemporary approaches to policy analysis, design and evidence that continue to render gender and diversity invisible.  Papers that address the future direction of gendered innovations in public policy research and analysis, be they theoretical, methodological or empirical, are also encouraged. 

 

Call for papers

Gendered Innovations in Public Policy Research

Panel sponsored by IPSA RC19 Gender, Politics and Public Policy

 

The importance of gendered innovations in the sciences and the social sciences has become increasingly recognised in recent years.  ‘Gendered Innovation’ has been defined as the process that integrates sex and gender analysis into all phases of basic and applied research to assure excellence and quality in outcomes (Schiebinger et al 2013).  While this definition informs current research in the sciences, similar feminist approaches to public policy analysis have resulted in new theoretical, methodological and empirical understandings of how gender inequalities are produced through policy and what is required to achieve gender equality in the future.  As such, feminist and gendered policy research has enhanced the field of public policy, challenging the gender neutrality of core concepts and conclusions by ensuring gender, and intersectionality, sit at the centre of the analysis.

 

Yet there remain many intractable policy ‘problems’, global and local, that continue to have a disproportional impact on women’s wellbeing and, at both the national and international level, systematic gender analysis remains patchy at best, often dependent on political will. Alongside this, evidence-based policy making, big data and ‘social investment’ strategies, have become the ‘go to’ concepts and methods for governments looking for ‘innovative’ solutions.  Scholars are engaging critically with these constructs, but seldom from a gender or intersectional perspective.

 

As such, we welcome papers that take stock of the innovative knowledges and understandings produced by feminist policy scholars to date, evaluate feminist policy practices that have produced innovative or transformative change, and challenge and critique contemporary approaches to policy analysis, design and evidence that continue to render gender and diversity invisible.  Papers that address the future direction of gendered innovations in public policy research and analysis, be they theoretical, methodological or empirical, are also encouraged. 

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