T02P36 - Innovation, Governance and Reform: Lessons from the Developing World

Topic : Comparative Public Policy

Panel Chair : WELLINGTON ALMEIDA - almeidawellington@uol.com.br

Panel Second Chair : Calmon Paulo - paulo.calmon@gmail.com

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

Note: This Panel is eligible for the GCPSE (UNDP) Grant.

 

 

In the last decades there has been a new wave of public sector reforms. Most of these attempts aim to improve government effectiveness by transforming governance structures and adopting new policy instruments and processes. But many of them have produced limited or mixed results as they were targeted on isomorphic institutional changes, supported by a narrow group of government actors intending to gain political and financial support from the international community and privileged constituencies.

On the other hand, there have been several attempts to do reform differently, not ignoring contextual factors and the complexity of problems faced by developing countries, but fostering innovation, adaptation and learning. Among these reforms we can mention the efforts to advance new modes of governance and social coordination, new uses of social media and social networks, new monitoring and evaluation strategies, the incentive to develop a wide range of learning communities and communities or practice in the public sector, and the use of social analytics in planning, implementing and evaluating public policies and governmental programs.

Public policy reform, and specially, public policy innovation, is a somewhat new subject that has been receiving growing attention in academic and professional circles. But to understand the role of public policy innovation in developing countries requires new analytical frameworks, new methodologies, and a better understanding of the dynamics of organizational and institutional changes and the ways to engage citizens on the decision making process and the co-production of collective goods.

In other words, as the strategic importance of fostering public policy innovation became acknowledged, many important questions stay unanswered, such as: What exactly should be considered as a public policy innovation in the developing world, and what impact they have on politics and collective life, locally, nationally and internationally? What conditions, causal mechanisms or different modes of public policy innovations might be identified both historically and in the present? What do new forms public policy innovation mean for the development processes in different institutional and cultural contexts? How do public policy innovations interact with other traditional institutions and organizations in the public sector and society? How public policy innovation affect core functions and processes inside the government, including (but not limited to) human resources management, regulation, budgeting and financial management, project management and performance management? What methodologies are most effective for conducting research on these questions? Can public policy innovations in developed world inform new demands in Latin America, East Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (or vice-versa)?

This panel is open for the experience of countries in the so-called developing regions (Latin America, Africa, Middle-East, Eastern Europe and Asia), but also for comparative studies examining experiences of different countries. We especially welcome papers that are explicitly interdisciplinary and that foster discussion of research that is informed by diverse theoretical and analytical approaches. Papers may address topics that are historical and/or contemporary. We also welcome proposals that showcase case studies that explore salient issues related to public policy innovation in developing countries.

 

Call for papers

Public policy reform, and specially, public policy innovation, is a somewhat new subject that has been receiving growing attention in academic and professional circles. But to understand the role of public policy innovation in developing countries requires new analytical frameworks, new methodologies, and a better understanding of the dynamics of organizational and institutional changes and the ways to engage citizens on the decision making process and the co-production of collective goods.

In other words, as the strategic importance of fostering public policy innovation became acknowledged, many important questions stay unanswered, such as: What exactly should be considered as a public policy innovation in the developing world, and what impact they have on politics and collective life, locally, nationally and internationally? What conditions, causal mechanisms or different modes of public policy innovations might be identified both historically and in the present? What do new forms public policy innovation mean for the development processes in different institutional and cultural contexts? How do public policy innovations interact with other traditional institutions and organizations in the public sector and society? How public policy innovation affect core functions and processes inside the government? What methodologies are most effective for conducting research on these questions? Can public policy innovations in developed world inform new demands in Latin America, East Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East (or vice-versa)?

This panel is open for theoretic analysis as well as case studies of countries in the so-called developing regions (Latin America, Africa, Middle-East, Eastern Europe and Asia). We especially welcome papers that are explicitly interdisciplinary and that foster discussion of research that is informed by diverse policy approaches. Papers may address topics that are historical and/or contemporary. We also welcome proposals that showcase new approached that explore salient issues related to public policy innovation in developing countries.

 

 

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