T03P12 - Policy Processes through the Prism of Mobilizations

Topic : Policy and Politics sponsored by Policy & Politics Journal

Panel Chair : Dounia Khallouki - dounia.khallouki@entpe.fr

Panel Second Chair : Jean-Gabriel Contamin - jean-gabriel.contamin@univ-lille2.fr

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

In this panel a selection of papers may be considered for the Policy & Politics journal.

 

 

All around the world, more and more public action projects face strong citizen protests. From infrastructure projects to reform projects, many cases of such conflicts can be observed recently. For instance, in the past few years, plans for expansion or creation of airports have led to conflicts and tensions with the local population, like around London Heathrow airport (Griggs, Howarth, 2004). Similarly, in Germany, the Stuttgart 21 train station project has led to a great contestation among citizens. And those conflicts sometimes reach a very high level of tensions. For instance, the Notre-Dame-Des-Landes airport or the Sivens dam have been particularly contested in France and have led to important and violent mobilizations. The recent reform about labor in France is also a relevant example of a project strongly contested by the population

This panel aims to gather grounded proposals which question the specificities of the mobilizations emerging against such contested projects, as well as the conditions for success of these mobilizations. It aims also to gather proposals that focus on the answers that the authorities bring to these mobilizations, including on the participatory procedures that are often set up in response. Are these procedures contributing to resolve conflicts? Are they not sometimes causing a radicalization of the confrontation? Under what conditions do they "succeed" in influencing policy processes?

This panel also aims at focusing on big infrastructures projects that are now sometimes qualified as "Large Useless Imposed Projects".  The idea is to question the mobilizations they may induce but also the answers that are given by authorities to these mobilizations and the results of these confrontations, postulating that tough conflicts are particularly good opportunities to study policy processes.

So, the main questions which will be addressed in this panel are:

- How some mobilizations manage to impact decision process more than others?
- What types of responses are given by authorities to those protests?
- Under what conditions do those responses "succeed"?
- And, finally, what makes mobilizations around "Large Useless Imposed Projects" specific?
In addition, the panel will be the opportunity to ask in what extent it might be fruitful to study policy processes through tough conflicts.

 

 

Call for papers

All around the world, more and more public action projects face strong citizen protests. From infrastructure projects to reform projects, many cases of such conflicts can be observed recently. And those conflicts sometimes reach a very high level of tensions. For instance, in France, the Sivens dam has led to important and violent mobilizations.

This panel aims to gather grounded proposals which question the specificities of the mobilizations emerging against such contested projects, as well as the conditions for success of these mobilizations. It aims also to gather proposals that focus on the answers that the authorities bring to these mobilizations, including on the participatory procedures that are often set up in response. Are these procedures contributing to resolve conflicts? Are they not sometimes causing a radicalization of the confrontation? Under what conditions do they "succeed" in influencing policy processes?

This panel also aims at focusing on big infrastructures projects that are now sometimes qualified as "Large Useless Imposed Projects".  The idea is to question the mobilizations they may induce but also the answers that are given by authorities to these mobilizations and the results of these confrontations, postulating that tough conflicts are particularly good opportunities to study policy processes.

So, the main questions which will be addressed in this panel are:

- How some mobilizations manage to impact decision process more than others?
- What types of responses are given by authorities to those protests?
- Under what conditions do those responses "succeed"?
- And, finally, what makes mobilizations around "Large Useless Imposed Projects" specific?
In addition, the panel will be the opportunity to ask in what extent it might be fruitful to study policy processes through tough conflicts.

Any empirical and theoretical proposals corresponding to these prospects, based on comparative or monographic approach, will be examined with interest.

 

 

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