T13P05 - Towards Inclusive Bureaucracies for Diverse Societies - Policy Implications of (Non-)Representative Bureaucracies

Topic : Gender, Diversity and Public Policy

Panel Chair : Eckhard Schroeter - eckhard.schroeter@zu.de

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

Note: This Panel is eligible for the GCPSE (UNDP) Grant.

 

 

Questions of ethnicity, multi-culturalism, gender or social equity have become increasingly salient to political discourses and public policy-making. To the extent that societies have become more diverse and struggle with their inclusiveness, the theory and practice of representative bureaucracy also becomes more significant to students of public policy and administration. The concept of representative bureaucracy raises questions about the link between the socio-demographic make-up of public bureaucracies, government responsiveness and administrative accountability as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of public policy making and implementation.

The study of representative bureaucracy is concerned with the relationships between the make-up of public sector workforces and the socio-demographic characteristics of the societies they are supposed to serve. As public bureaucracies are major players in the making and implementation of public policies, the questions whether diverse social groups are ‘passively’ or even ‘actively’ represented in public sector organizations also move to center stage of public policy analysis. So, what are the consequences of ‘representativeness’ – or the lack of it – for the quality of service delivery, for relations to citizens, and for the diversity management within public organizations? And what are the wider implications for the levels of public trust, the accountability and legitimacy of government, and for power-sharing arrangements in state and society?

This panels seeks to advance the comparative analysis of the policy implications (ranging from the agenda-setting and formulation of public policies to the delivery and evaluation of public policy programs) of having or not having public bureaucracies that can serve as representative institutions. To this aim, theoretical and empirical (both qualitative and quantitative) submissions are invited. In addition to individual case or country studies, contributions with comparative perspectives looking at variation across policy domains, types of public sector organizations, levels of government or national systems of public policy-making are particularly encouraged.

Call for papers

Questions of ethnicity, multi-culturalism, gender or social equity have become increasingly salient to political discourses and public policy-making. To the extent that societies have become more diverse and struggle with their inclusiveness, the theory and practice of representative bureaucracy also becomes more significant to students of public policy and administration. The concept of representative bureaucracy raises questions about the link between the socio-demographic make-up of public bureaucracies, government responsiveness and administrative accountability as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of public policy making and implementation.

The study of representative bureaucracy is concerned with the relationships between the make-up of public sector workforces and the socio-demographic characteristics of the societies they are supposed to serve. As public bureaucracies are major players in the making and implementation of public policies, the questions whether diverse social groups are ‘passively’ or even ‘actively’ represented in public sector organizations also move to center stage of public policy analysis. So, what are the consequences of ‘representativeness’ – or the lack of it – for the quality of service delivery, for relations to citizens, and for the diversity management within public organizations? And what are the wider implications for the levels of public trust, the accountability and legitimacy of government, and for power-sharing arrangements in state and society?

This panels seeks to advance the comparative analysis of the policy implications (ranging from the agenda-setting and formulation of public policies to the delivery and evaluation of public policy programs) of having or not having public bureaucracies that can serve as representative institutions. To this aim, theoretical and empirical (both qualitative and quantitative) submissions are invited. In addition to individual case or country studies, contributions with comparative perspectives looking at variation across policy domains, types of public sector organizations, levels of government or national systems of public policy-making are particularly encouraged.

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