T16P04 - Responding to Water Scarcity and Quality in the Nexus: Effects on the Water, Energy and Food Sectors

Topic : Sustainable Development and Policy

Panel Chair : Cecilia Tortajada - cecilia.tortajada@nus.edu.sg

Panel Second Chair : Quentin Grafton - quentin.grafton@anu.edu.au

Panel Third Chair : Jamie Pittock - jamie.pittock@anu.edu.au

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

PANEL PROPOSAL – Responding to water scarcity and quality in the nexus: Effects on the water, energy and food sectors

 

Institute of Water Policy, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore

The Australian National University, UNESCO Chair in Water Economics and Transboundary Water Governance

 

In an increasingly globalized and interconnected world, societies are becoming less resilient with respect to shocks to water, food and energy resources. Long term developments such as population growth, urbanization and industrialization in emerging markets, as well as the impending threat of climate change, are increasing the impacts on these critically important resources. Private, public and civic institutions must respond to these challenges.

 

The complexities of water, food and energy sectors must understood in relation to each other as well as within their own social, economic, natural, political and cultural environments, and not in isolation. Water is a critical resource for global sustainability and has a fundamental role in every sector. The effective governance of water can offer very large benefits to people and ecosystems, but typically water is not used or allocated to reflect its scarcity value.  Water is also essential for crop production, be this for food, feed, fibre or fuels.

                                 

Food sustainability depends on the resilience of related agro-ecosystems, of which water is a fundamental component. Water, and its proper management, are indispensable for energy production and power generation. Water is used extensively in energy extraction, refining, processing and transportation; and energy is essential for transporting water over long distances, for treating water, and distributing it to end users, and for collecting and treating wastewater. Policies that take into account trade-offs, complementarities and resource constraints between water, food and energy are not yet effectively developed despite the urgent need.

 

In this session the speakers will discuss the effects of water scarcity (both in terms of quantity and quality) on food and energy needs today and tomorrow. Particular attention will be given to the policy framework and institutional underpinnings required to respond to the needs of the water, energy and food sectors. Case studies of projects, cities and regions will be discussed along with a framework to understand the complex interdependencies across the sectors and pathways to sustainable governance of water.

Call for papers

Panel proposal – Responding to water scarcity and quality in the nexus: Effects on the water, energy and food sectors

 

Institute of Water Policy, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore

The Australian National University, UNESCO Chair in Water Economics and Transboundary Water Governance

 

In an increasingly globalized and interconnected world, societies are becoming less resilient with respect to shocks to water, food and energy resources. Long term developments such as population growth, urbanization and industrialization in emerging markets, as well as the impending threat of climate change, are increasing the impacts on these critically important resources. Private, public and civic institutions must respond to these challenges.

 

The complexities of water, food and energy sectors must understood in relation to each other as well as within their own social, economic, natural, political and cultural environments, and not in isolation.

                                 

Food sustainability depends on the resilience of related agro-ecosystems, of which water is a fundamental component. Water, and its proper management, are indispensable for energy production and power generation. Water is used extensively in energy extraction, refining, processing and transportation; and energy is essential for transporting water over long distances, for treating water, and distributing it to end users, and for collecting and treating wastewater. Policies that take into account trade-offs, complementarities and resource constraints between water, food and energy are not yet effectively developed despite the urgent need.

 

In this session the speakers will discuss the effects of water scarcity (both in terms of quantity and quality) on food and energy needs today and tomorrow. Particular attention will be given to the policy framework and institutional underpinnings required to respond to the needs of the water, energy and food sectors. Case studies of projects, cities and regions will be discussed along with a framework to understand the complex interdependencies across the sectors and pathways to sustainable governance of water.

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