T09P01 - Natural Resource Governance in the Extractive Industries and Sustainable Development: State, Corporate and Civil Society Dynamics

Topic : Governance, Policy networks and Multi-level Governance

Panel Chair : Jason McSparren - jason.mcsparren001@umb.edu

Panel Second Chair : Tok M. Evren - evrentok@gmail.com

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

Natural resource governance is a multifaceted and complex concept that demands continued analysis of the implications for public policy, corporate practices and civil society participation. This panel is specifically concerned with the activities related to non-renewable extractive industries which include the mining for metals and minerals and the exploitation of oil and natural gas deposits. Continued analysis of the policies, processes, programs, actual practices and outcomes is necessary to gain a comprehensive understanding of what natural resource governance is within our neoliberal world order as policy and products transverse the varieties of market and political systems that exist in reality today. In order to balance efficiency and equity – continued wealth creation and the promotion of sustainable development – scholars, policy makers, corporate executives and civil society actors need to evaluate the pros and cons of the policies and practices within the extractive industries that facilitate flows of product and the flows of revenue across the transnational, national, regional and sub-state levels.

This modern era of neoliberalism has had profound effects on social organization by privileging market mechanisms above state regulation. It is understood that power relations between transnational corporations and governments put developing states at a disadvantage to monitor extraction levels and claim a fair share of the revenues derived from the non-renewable extractive sectors. Moreover, political corruption has contributed to the distortion of economic equity in resource rich developing states at both the national and sub-national levels. Additionally, in many cases, community opposition to industrial resource extraction has been met with state- and private-sponsored repression leading to violence, property loss and dislocation of communities. Therefore, within the sector, it is necessary to analyze governance attributes of transparency, accountability and inclusion.

This panel welcomes analysis of natural resource governance at various political levels, across global regions, and specific sector and programmatic focuses which may be either interconnected or overlap the public, private civil society sectors. Relevant topics may include, but is not limited to: global governance regimes (i.e. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights, the African Mining Vision for instance), terms of trade within bi- and multi-lateral trade agreements, state laws and regulations regarding corporate taxation, revenue flows, and environmental and human rights protections, intra-state conflict, and corporate and state programs designed to enhance local beneficiation such as development of occupational skills, local procurement, down-stream and side stream economic diversification and the like.

Globalization and broad modernization processes produce increased demand for extractive minerals and fuels. Some benefit at the expense of others. The search for solutions to these conflicts of interest needs to continue. Moreover, the inhumane effects of wide-spread poverty need to be alleviated. The non-renewable natural resource extractive sectors are situated within the scope of these developmental issues and therefore, the governance of extractive resources must remain a focus of attention and innovation. This panel welcomes analysis of these elements of the amorphous concept known as natural resource governance.

Call for papers

This panel will analyze natural resource governance across multiple scopes of influence in search of best practices and policy recommendations as a means to promote sustainable development. Natural resource governance is a multifaceted and complex concept that demands continued analysis of the implications for public policy, corporate practices and civil society participation. This panel is specifically concerned with the activities related to non-renewable extractive industries which include the mining for metals and minerals and the exploitation of oil and natural gas deposits. Continued analysis of the policies, processes, programs, actual practices and outcomes is necessary to gain a comprehensive understanding of what natural resource governance is within our neoliberal world order as policy and products transverse the varieties of market and political systems that exist in reality today.

This panel welcomes analysis of natural resource governance at various political levels, across global regions, and specific sector and programmatic focuses which may be either interconnected or overlap the public, private civil society sectors. Relevant topics may include, but is not limited to: global governance regimes (i.e. Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights, the African Mining Vision for instance), terms of trade within bi- and multi-lateral trade agreements, state laws and regulations regarding corporate taxation, revenue flows, and environmental and human rights protections, intra-state conflict, and corporate and state programs designed to enhance local beneficiation such as development of occupational skills, local procurement, down-stream and side stream economic diversification and the like.

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