T02P12 - Analysing Knowledge Policy Coordination for the 21st Century

Topic : Comparative Public Policy

Panel Chair : Martina Vukasovic - martina.vukasovic@ugent.be

Panel Second Chair : Jens Jungblut - jungblut@iped.uio.no

Panel Third Chair : Meng Hsuan Chou - Hsuan@ntu.edu.sg

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

Achieving effective and efficient coordination is at the heart of good public policymaking. This panel proposes to examine the multi-faceted coordination challenges and opportunities by looking at the case of knowledge policy domain through an explicit framework emphasising its multi-issue, multi-actor, and multi-level nature.
The global shift towards knowledge-based societies has placed knowledge at the core of contemporary public policy. However, the governance of knowledge requires collaboration across multiple policy sectors, e.g. higher education, research, and trade. While this brings forward the multi-issue aspect of policy coordination, it also points to the presence of state actors (e.g. different ministries and agencies), businesses, as well as non-state actors (interest groups and stakeholder organizations), adding a multi-actor aspect. Extant research has revealed how these two features already contribute to several coordination challenges – duplication, inconsistencies, clashing priorities, and potential bureaucratic and political conflict (Braun, 2008; Peters, 2015). So far largely missing from these analyses of policy coordination is a consideration of multi-level governance aspects. This includes ‘new’ actors increasingly involved in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of policy which are operating across governance levels (Gornitzka & Maassen, 2000; Olsen, 1988), but also transnational and sub-national governance layers, given that devolution to regions—both supranational and subnational—is an important feature of contemporary governance (Chou & Ravinet, 2015; Jayasuriya & Robertson, 2010; Piattoni, 2010).
So far, these multi-issue, multi-level and multi-actor dimensions have largely been studied in isolation from each other, preventing a full(er) understanding of the nuances and complexities of policy coordination. This panel invites researchers from diverse disciplines interested in knowledge policies to examine “the three multi’s” in a systematic and explicit manner, including explorations of interactions between them. All accepted papers must have a clear conceptual approach, supported by empirical examples, preferably beyond a single case study.
We propose three sections, each giving primacy to one of the three multi’s, while at the same time highlighting interactions with the other two.


References
Braun, D. (2008). Organising the political coordination of knowledge and innovation policies. Science and Public Policy, 35(4), 227-239. doi:10.3152/030234208x287056
Chou, M.-H., & Ravinet, P. (2015). Governing higher education beyond the state: The rise of ‘Higher education regionalism'. In H. De Boer, D. D. Dill, J. Huisman, & M. Souto-Otero (Eds.), Handbook of Higher Education Policy and Governance (pp. 361-378). London: Palgrave.
Gornitzka, Å., & Maassen, P. (2000). Hybrid steering approaches with respect to European higher education. Higher Education Policy, 13(3), 267-285.
Jayasuriya, K., & Robertson, S. L. (2010). Regulatory regionalism and the governance of higher education. Globalisation, Societies and Education, 8(1), 1-6. doi:10.1080/14767720903573993
Olsen, J. P. (1988). Administrative reform and theories of organization. In C. Campbell & B. G. Peters (Eds.), Organizing governance, governing organizations (pp. 233-254). Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.
Peters, B. G. (2015). Pursuing horizontal managment: the politics of public sector coordination. Kansas: University press of Kansas.
Piattoni, S. (2010). The theory of multi-level governance: conceptual, empirical, and normative challenges. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Call for papers

Achieving effective and efficient coordination is at the heart of good public policymaking. This panel proposes to examine the multi-faceted coordination challenges and opportunities by looking at the case of knowledge policy domain through an explicit framework emphasising its multi-issue, multi-actor, and multi-level nature.
The global shift towards knowledge-based societies has placed knowledge at the core of contemporary public policy. However, the governance of knowledge requires collaboration across multiple policy sectors, e.g. higher education, research, and trade. While this brings forward the multi-issue aspect of policy coordination, it also points to the presence of state actors (e.g. different ministries and agencies), businesses, as well as non-state actors (interest groups and stakeholder organizations), adding a multi-actor aspect. Extant research has revealed how these two features already contribute to several coordination challenges – duplication, inconsistencies, clashing priorities, and potential bureaucratic and political conflict. So far largely missing from these analyses of policy coordination is a consideration of multi-level governance aspects. This includes ‘new’ actors increasingly involved in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of policy which are operating across governance levels, but also transnational and sub-national governance layers, given that devolution to regions—both supranational and subnational—is an important feature of contemporary governance.
So far, these multi-issue, multi-level and multi-actor dimensions have largely been studied in isolation from each other, preventing a full(er) understanding of the nuances and complexities of policy coordination. This panel invites researchers from diverse disciplines interested in knowledge policies to examine “the three multi’s” in a systematic and explicit manner, including explorations of interactions between them. All accepted papers must have a clear conceptual approach, supported by empirical examples, preferably beyond a single case study.

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