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COURSES

 COURSES For PhD Students and Early career Researchers

Course 1 for Ph.D. Students and Early Career scholars: Policy Design: Theory and Methods by B. Guy Peters

Policymaking involves designing the interventions of the public sector intended to correct policy problems. This course will discuss the development of thinking about policy design and the components of design (problems, instruments, evaluation, and intervention). Some attention will be paid to addressing complex and "wicked" problems, and to emerging ideas about designing.

 

Course 2 for Ph.D. and Early Career Scholar: Policy dynamics: Theory and Methods by Laura Chaquès

The aim of this course is to study the role social groups and interest organizations play in the policy process. Interest groups – business groups, to non-governmental organizations, trade unions, professional associations, or think tanks— are key providers of information and technical knowledge, represent different views and ways of thinking about policy issues, and increasingly, they become key actors in the policy process in most advanced democracies. The course is aimed to: (1) analyse under what conditions interest groups participate in the policy process, and to what extent important differences exist across types of groups, across issues, countries and levels of governance –supranational, national, sub-national level—; (2) study how interest groups activities affect policy outcomes, paying special attention to agenda-setting and social capital theories. Finally, the course is also aimed to provide students with methodological tools for the study of interest organizations and policy dynamics.

 

Course 3 for Ph.D. Students and Early Career scholars: Public Policy Process: Theory and Methods by Frank Fischer

This course and the corresponding workshop examine the theory of the public policy process, with an emphasis on political, conceptual and methodological issues. It begins with an exploration of the evolution of theory development in public policy studies, including an emphasis on the interplay among competing for analytical criteria--efficiency, equity, and legitimacy—in policy decision processes.  The discussion then turns to an investigation of each phase of the policymaking process, from the politics of agenda-setting (emphasizing interest group competition, parties, movements and the media), policy formulation (focused on policy advice, cost-benefit analysis and epistemic policy communities), policy decision-making and adoption (concerned with state imperatives and models of power), implementation (dealing with policy design, bureaucratic politics, and program recipients), and policy evaluation and learning (comparing technocratic versus constructivist and collaborative approaches).   

 

Course for practitioners

Course 4 for practitioners: Policy Coordination by Charlotte Halpern

Policy coordination - across policy domains, across levels of governments, across policy stages - constitutes a major challenge for policy analysts as well as for practitioners. Yet public policies are usually discussed one by one, and in practice, policy coordination is often extremely difficult to achieve. Drawing on the methods and tools available in the public policy literature, as well as on specific case studies, this course will examine the reasons for promoting greater coordination, highlight the barriers preventing such coordination, and explore the various mechanisms through which policy coordination may contribute to more effective political capacities. Lectures will be complemented by case study discussions during workshops.

 

Course 5 for practitioners: Policy Evaluation and Policy Process by Isabelle Engelli

Evaluation is the activity through which we develop an understanding of the merit, worth, and utility of a policy.  It is important to understand how policy evaluation fits into the larger policy process and above all it is important to understand what policy evaluation can be according to the context to which it is applied and how policy evaluation can really do to improve policy design as well policy implementation. In this course, Policy Evaluation will be dealt with as an ongoing activity that encompasses all the policy process, thus the main analytical focus will be on evaluating: the policy content (the policy design); the policy implementation and the policy outcomes.  

 

Course 6 for practitioners: Policy Design by Giliberto Capano

The objective of the course will be to introduce participants to the theory and practice of Public Policy Design. It will begin with a discussion of the concept and challenges of policy design (main questions here will be: What is Policy Design? What is Good Policy Design? Who Designs Public Policies? Why Do They Do It? How and When Do Designs Come About? What is Good Policy Design? How Should the Design of Specific Policies be Evaluated? Can the Design of Public Policies be Improved to Solve Complex Problems?). Next, it will discuss the process of policy design: understanding and defining the policy problem, surveying the range of tools available to address the defined problem and assessing the appropriateness of the tools against technical, political, operational, and capacity criteria. Finally, it will discuss how to apply policy design in the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of policies. Particular analytical attention will be devoted to what actors design and to which kind of policy instruments policy designers have at their disposal to deal with collective problems. Specific attention will pe paid to the role of bureaucrats and public decision-makers in the process of designing policies. Lectures will be complemented by case study discussions during workshops.

 

Course 7 for practitioners: Policy Implementation and Street Level Bureaucracy by Peter Hupe

When the objectives of public policy have been formulated and decided upon, the rest seems just a matter of implementation. The latter is assumed as a purely administrative activity. After all, the policy goals are supposed to provide instructions which only have to be followed. However, it is in the process of realizing those goals that public policies get their final substance and form. Particularly crucial is what happens in and around the encounter between individual citizens and the public officials working at the street level of government bureaucracy. This makes policy implementation, more than a subordinate ‘stage’, a multi-dimensional and dynamic part of the policy process. While specific attention is given to the role of street-level bureaucrats, the objective of the course is to better understand these dynamics and the multiple dimensions involved.

 

Course 8 for practitioners: Policy Making between Politics, bureaucrats and Experts by Philippe Zittoun

The goal of the course is to propose a better understanding of the policymaking process by highlighting the role of bureaucrats, experts, and politicians in the process. Far away from the idea of a clear definition of role and tasks of each, the study of policymaking “in action” allow understanding the complexity of interlaced roles. The course will pay attention to the knowledge-making, to the argumentative process and to the conflictual face of any policymaking process.

COURSES

IPPA-ENAP Summer School - Brasilia 5th Edition 18 - 22 May 2020

 COURSES For PhD Students and Early career Researchers

Course 1 for Ph.D. Students and Early Career scholars: Policy Design: Theory and Methods by B. Guy Peters

Policymaking involves designing the interventions of the public sector intended to correct policy problems. This course will discuss the development of thinking about policy design and the components of design (problems, instruments, evaluation, and intervention). Some attention will be paid to addressing complex and "wicked" problems, and to emerging ideas about designing.

 

Course 2 for Ph.D. and Early Career Scholar: Policy dynamics: Theory and Methods by Laura Chaquès

The aim of this course is to study the role social groups and interest organizations play in the policy process. Interest groups – business groups, to non-governmental organizations, trade unions, professional associations, or think tanks— are key providers of information and technical knowledge, represent different views and ways of thinking about policy issues, and increasingly, they become key actors in the policy process in most advanced democracies. The course is aimed to: (1) analyse under what conditions interest groups participate in the policy process, and to what extent important differences exist across types of groups, across issues, countries and levels of governance –supranational, national, sub-national level—; (2) study how interest groups activities affect policy outcomes, paying special attention to agenda-setting and social capital theories. Finally, the course is also aimed to provide students with methodological tools for the study of interest organizations and policy dynamics.

 

Course 3 for Ph.D. Students and Early Career scholars: Public Policy Process: Theory and Methods by Frank Fischer

This course and the corresponding workshop examine the theory of the public policy process, with an emphasis on political, conceptual and methodological issues. It begins with an exploration of the evolution of theory development in public policy studies, including an emphasis on the interplay among competing for analytical criteria--efficiency, equity, and legitimacy—in policy decision processes.  The discussion then turns to an investigation of each phase of the policymaking process, from the politics of agenda-setting (emphasizing interest group competition, parties, movements and the media), policy formulation (focused on policy advice, cost-benefit analysis and epistemic policy communities), policy decision-making and adoption (concerned with state imperatives and models of power), implementation (dealing with policy design, bureaucratic politics, and program recipients), and policy evaluation and learning (comparing technocratic versus constructivist and collaborative approaches).   

 

Course for practitioners

Course 4 for practitioners: Policy Coordination by Charlotte Halpern

Policy coordination - across policy domains, across levels of governments, across policy stages - constitutes a major challenge for policy analysts as well as for practitioners. Yet public policies are usually discussed one by one, and in practice, policy coordination is often extremely difficult to achieve. Drawing on the methods and tools available in the public policy literature, as well as on specific case studies, this course will examine the reasons for promoting greater coordination, highlight the barriers preventing such coordination, and explore the various mechanisms through which policy coordination may contribute to more effective political capacities. Lectures will be complemented by case study discussions during workshops.

 

Course 5 for practitioners: Policy Evaluation and Policy Process by Isabelle Engelli

Evaluation is the activity through which we develop an understanding of the merit, worth, and utility of a policy.  It is important to understand how policy evaluation fits into the larger policy process and above all it is important to understand what policy evaluation can be according to the context to which it is applied and how policy evaluation can really do to improve policy design as well policy implementation. In this course, Policy Evaluation will be dealt with as an ongoing activity that encompasses all the policy process, thus the main analytical focus will be on evaluating: the policy content (the policy design); the policy implementation and the policy outcomes.  

 

Course 6 for practitioners: Policy Design by Giliberto Capano

The objective of the course will be to introduce participants to the theory and practice of Public Policy Design. It will begin with a discussion of the concept and challenges of policy design (main questions here will be: What is Policy Design? What is Good Policy Design? Who Designs Public Policies? Why Do They Do It? How and When Do Designs Come About? What is Good Policy Design? How Should the Design of Specific Policies be Evaluated? Can the Design of Public Policies be Improved to Solve Complex Problems?). Next, it will discuss the process of policy design: understanding and defining the policy problem, surveying the range of tools available to address the defined problem and assessing the appropriateness of the tools against technical, political, operational, and capacity criteria. Finally, it will discuss how to apply policy design in the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of policies. Particular analytical attention will be devoted to what actors design and to which kind of policy instruments policy designers have at their disposal to deal with collective problems. Specific attention will pe paid to the role of bureaucrats and public decision-makers in the process of designing policies. Lectures will be complemented by case study discussions during workshops.

 

Course 7 for practitioners: Policy Implementation and Street Level Bureaucracy by Peter Hupe

When the objectives of public policy have been formulated and decided upon, the rest seems just a matter of implementation. The latter is assumed as a purely administrative activity. After all, the policy goals are supposed to provide instructions which only have to be followed. However, it is in the process of realizing those goals that public policies get their final substance and form. Particularly crucial is what happens in and around the encounter between individual citizens and the public officials working at the street level of government bureaucracy. This makes policy implementation, more than a subordinate ‘stage’, a multi-dimensional and dynamic part of the policy process. While specific attention is given to the role of street-level bureaucrats, the objective of the course is to better understand these dynamics and the multiple dimensions involved.

 

Course 8 for practitioners: Policy Making between Politics, bureaucrats and Experts by Philippe Zittoun

The goal of the course is to propose a better understanding of the policymaking process by highlighting the role of bureaucrats, experts, and politicians in the process. Far away from the idea of a clear definition of role and tasks of each, the study of policymaking “in action” allow understanding the complexity of interlaced roles. The course will pay attention to the knowledge-making, to the argumentative process and to the conflictual face of any policymaking process.