T04P05 - Revisiting Policy Entrepreneurship

Topic : Problems and Agenda Setting

Panel Chair : Gordon Shockley - shockley@asu.edu

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

This panel revisits the idea of policy entrepreneurship.  The idea of policy entrepreneurship can be traced back to preeminent political scientists such as John Kingdon (1995) and William Riker (1982, 1986).  Recent efforts have adapted classical theories to entrepreneurship in public affairs (Mintrom & Vergari, 1996; Sheingate, 2003; Shockley, 2008).  Many policy process theories rely on some conception of policy entrepreneurship (Baumgartner & Jones, 1993; Carpenter, 2001; Ingram & Ullery, 1980).  Revisiting policy entrepreneurship, this panel seeks to clarify, deepen, and extend its use from a theoretical and practical perspective.  One theme of this panel is that policy entrepreneurship can be seen as ubiquitous in all human political endeavors.  Traces of this theme can be found in prior theories (e.g., Mintrom, 2000; Osborne & Gaebler, 1992; Schneider & Teske, 1992; Schneider, Teske, & Mintrom, 1995).  Another theme is that policy entrepreneurship emphasizes not only the descriptive power of identifying individual policy entrepreneurs (e.g., Carpenter, 2001; Doig & Hargrove, 1987; Frohlich, Oppenheimer, & Young, 1971) but also the explanatory power of entrepreneurship in public policy (Sheingate, 2003).  For this panel we would seek papers to amplify both of these themes.  Specifying the function of policy entrepreneurship in the policy process – and the different models of the policy process – is a key objective of the panel. 

 

Baumgartner, F. R., & Jones, B. D. (1993). Agendas and Instability in American Politics. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Carpenter, D. P. (2001). The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Reputation, Networks, and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies, 1862-1928. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Doig, J. W., & Hargrove, E. C. (Eds.). (1987). Leadership and Innovation: A Biographical Perspective on Entrepreneurs in Government. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

Frohlich, N., Oppenheimer, J. A., & Young, O. A. (1971). Political Leadership and Collective Goods. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Ingram, H. M., & Ullery, S. J. (1980). Policy Innovation and Institutional Fragmentation Policy Studies Journal (Vol. 8, pp. 664-682).

Kingdon, J. (1995). Agendas, Alternatives, and Public Policies (2nd ed.). New York: Addison-Wesley.

Mintrom, M. (2000). Policy Entrepreneurs and School Choice. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press.

Mintrom, M., & Vergari, S. (1996). Advocacy Coalitions, Policy Entrepreneurs, and Policy Change (Vol. 24, pp. 420-434).

Osborne, D., & Gaebler, T. (1992). Reinventing Government: How the Entrepreneurial Spirit Is Transforming the Public Sector. Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley.

Riker, W. H. (1982). Liberalism Against Populism: A Confrontation Between the Theory of Democracy and the Theory of Social Choice. San Francisco: W.H. Freeman and Company.

Riker, W. H. (1986). The Art of Political Manipulation. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press.

Schneider, M., & Teske, P. (1992). Toward a Theory of the Political Entrepreneur: Evidence from Local Government. American Political Science Review, 86(3), 737-747.

Schneider, M., Teske, P., & Mintrom, M. (1995). Public Entrepreneurs: Agents for Change in American Government. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Sheingate, A. D. (2003). Political Entrepreneurship, Institutional Change, and American Political Development. Studies in American Political Development, 17, 185-203.

Shockley, G. E. (2008). Policy Entrepreneurship: Reconceptualizing Entrepreneurship in Public Affairs. In G. E. Shockley, P. F. Frank & R. R. Stough (Eds.), Non-market Entrepreneurship: Interdisciplinary Approaches (pp. 143-171). Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, Mass. (USA): Edward Elgar.

 

 

Call for papers

Policy entrepreneurship has a decades-long history in political science and continues to reappear in the policy sciences.  This panel seeks to clarify, deepen, and extend use of policy entrepreneurship from a theoretical and practical perspective.  One theme of this panel is that policy entrepreneurship can be seen as ubiquitous in all human political endeavors.  Another theme is that policy entrepreneurship emphasizes not only the descriptive power of identifying individual policy entrepreneurs but also the explanatory power of entrepreneurship in public policy.  Specifying the function of policy entrepreneurship in the policy process – and the different models of the policy process – is a key objective of the panel. 

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