T17cP22 - Globalisation of Environmental Policy: National and International Interactions

Topic : Sectorial Policy - Environment

Panel Chair : Iftikhar Lodhi - ialodhi@gmail.com

Objectives and Scientific Relevance of the panel

Globalization is supposed to have engendered the race to the bottom: Competition for global capital, the opponents of globalization contend, forces governments, particularly those in developing countries, to lower their environmental standards.

However, greater integration of the world economy as well as various emerging global governance structures also mean that governments are facing increasing pressure to uphold international norms and standards, resulting in a race to the top instead.

As the proponents of globalization argue, developing countries are often on the receiving end of these norms and standards. The above changes should have led to rising environmental standards instead. Also, the integration and opening up of developing countries have also empowered local civil society, forcing their governments to take more serious action against environmental problems such as environmental degradation and greenhouse gas emissions.

The proposed panel hopes to address this debate. Papers addressing the theoretical and/or empirical dimensions of the issue are both welcome. Particularly, these papers may focus on related dynamics including the increasing number of local and global actors, growing governmental capacity as a result of economic development, interaction of domestic and international actors, and the changing nature of public policy processes across Asian developing countries.

Environmental policy is conceived broadly here. It includes but not limited to reduction in greenhouse gases, sustainable management of natural resource, and air and water pollution mitigation.

Call for papers

Globalization is supposed to have engendered the race to the bottom: Competition for global capital, the opponents of globalization contend, forces governments, particularly those in developing countries, to lower their environmental standards.

However, greater integration of the world economy as well as various emerging global governance structures also mean that governments are facing increasing pressure to uphold international norms and standards, resulting in a race to the top instead.

As the proponents of globalization argue, developing countries are often on the receiving end of these norms and standards. The above changes should have led to rising environmental standards instead. Also, the integration and opening up of developing countries have also empowered local civil society, forcing their governments to take more serious action against environmental problems such as environmental degradation and greenhouse gas emissions.

The proposed panel hopes to address this debate. Papers addressing the theoretical and/or empirical dimensions of the issue are both welcome. Particularly, these papers may focus on related dynamics including the increasing number of local and global actors, growing governmental capacity as a result of economic development, interaction of domestic and international actors, and the changing nature of public policy processes across Asian developing countries.

Environmental policy is conceived broadly here. It includes but not limited to reduction in greenhouse gases, sustainable management of natural resource, and air and water pollution mitigation.

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